Freshman First 40 — Day 17

DAY 17
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2011

Eph 4:2-3, 11-13 and Heb 10:24-25

What is a vocation? Is it a job? Is it a calling? Merriam-Webster defines it as “a summons or strong inclination to a particular state or course of action.” In St. Paul’s letter to the church in Ephesus, he tells the Ephesians exactly what they should aspire to be. He says:

“ Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one
another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit
through the bond of peace…So Christ himself gave the apostles,
the prophets, the evangelists, the pastors and teachers, to equip his
people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built
up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son
of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the
fullness of Christ.” (Ephesians 4:2-3,11-13)

Paul did not call them to be prophets, evangelists, pastors, or teachers. Rather, he called the prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers to something higher- humility, gentleness, patience, love, unity, and peace. These are the traits that Paul calls the members of the church to embody. He calls them to these values so that they may reach unity in faith. He calls them to live these values in a community of believers—the Body of Christ.

Paul was calling his people to community- not merely seeing members of their church for two hours on Sunday, but rather creating a community of believers that experience life together. Hebrews 10:24-25 says, “And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds, not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing.”

What does this mean for college students? The answer is simple. God does not necessarily call us to be teachers, or doctors, or musicians. God calls us to commune with Christians as a body of believers so that we may encourage one another. He gives us the vocation of community in Christ, no matter what our job may be.

ROBERT O’BRIEN
Class of 2013, Religion & the Arts

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